Ohio governor John Kasich spoke to conservative Republicans at the Shady Canyon Golf Club in California last week. One of several Presidential candidates in the 2016 race, Kasich needs a distinction to stand out from the crowd.

But what will work with voters? The old rules don’t seem to apply this year, “as voters angrily send a message that they’re tired of politics and politicians as usual.” David Lightman writes, “Kasich is held back by the very quality that endears him so to the insider political community: his resume.”

Mark Meckler, President of Citizens for Self-Governance, described one reason Kasich’s attitude might deter grassroots voters: “The base is looking for a candidate capable of attacking Democrats.” And Kasich has a record of working with them.

His practical message cast himself as a “conservative who seeks solutions and will work with anyone to find them.”

Is this what voters want, or will it make “grassroots conservatives seethe” as Lightman claims? We will see soon enough if his numbers get a boost in the polls.

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.