A convicted crack dealer, released early from prison, fatally stabbed his ex-girlfriend and her two young children. Wendell Callahan murdered the children, 7 and 10, simply for witnessing the death of their mother.  The most infuriating part of the story — he should have still been in jail.

Judicial Watch explains the background of Obama’s early release plan in detail:

Callahan…was released four years early because federal sentencing guidelines for crack dealers got reduced. The change is part of President Obama’s effort to reform the nation’s justice system as a way of ending racial discrimination. The initiative was technically launched back in 2010 when the president signed a measure that for the first time in decades relaxed drug-crime sentences he claimed discriminated against poor and minority offenders. This severely weakened a decades-old law enacted during the infamous crack cocaine epidemic that ravaged urban communities nationwide in the 1980s. As part of the movement the U.S. Sentencing Commission lowered maximum sentences for drug offenders and made it retroactive, leading to the early release of thousands of violent thugs like Callahan.

In November the administration began releasing 6,000 drug convicts coined “non-violent” offenders whose sentences were too long under the old guidelines.

Drug trafficking is a well known to be a violent industry. Assuming the criminals would be inherently non-violent upon release is simply ignorant. Will that be the case of every criminal released? Absolutely not. But it turns out there were multiple incidences to contradict the “non-violent” assumption.

News reports quickly surfaced contradicting the administration’s assessment that the newly released convicts were not violent. Among them was the leader of a multi-million dollar operation that smuggled drugs from Canada to Maine. Prosecutors refer to the 29-year-old con as a “drug kingpin” who was one of “America’s Most Wanted.”

As if it weren’t bad enough that the administration is rewarding thousands of criminals with get-out-of-jail cards, huge amounts of taxpayer dollars are being spent on programs to help them find housing and jobs. In the aftermath of the mass release of federal prisoners Judicial Watch reported on two “re-entry” programs to ease the transition from jail. One received $1.7 million and ordered public housing facilities not to reject tenants with criminal records. The other allocated $20 million to the Department of Labor (DOL) to help ex-cons find work and thus end the “cycle of poverty, criminality and incarceration.”

While the idea of helping ex-cons restructure and restart their lives is a noble one, it’s not something that the government should fund through the hard earned dollars of  law abiding, tax-paying citizens.

 

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