According to the American Conservative, it appeared that the Republican Study Committee was moving towards modernizing the Republican approach to intellectual property law.

A Republican Study Committee policy brief released today to members of the House Conservative Caucus and various think tanks lays out “three myths about copyright law” and some ways to go about correcting what many see as a broken system. Derek Khanna, the RSC staffer who authored the paper, acknowledges an important role for intellectual property while also pointing out how badly the current system has gone off track.

The paper also suggests four potential solutions:

  1. Statutory damages reform — in other words, saving granny the legal headaches
  2. Expand fair use — set those DJs free!
  3. Punish false copyright claims
  4. Heavily limit copyright terms, and create disincentives for renewal

That would be a heck of a start towards making copyright actually incentivize innovation, rather than stifling it, as it most often does today.

Unfortunately, it appears that the RSC has now withdrawn their support of that policy paper.   Read the whole story here.

About The Author

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.

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