Ever asked yourself, I wonder which federal agencies get sworn at the most?

Maybe not, but I bet you’ll find the answer interesting!

Philip Bump did a little research on Regulations.gov about how often two swear words (“one of which starts with F and one of which starts with an S”) appeared in public comments on federally proposed regulations. He charted the number of occurrences to discover which agencies provoke the most bile.

Since Obama’s second inauguration, who’s the winner?

You guessed it – the IRS.

IRS regulations received more than double the number of comments with profanity than any other agency.

But I bet you won’t be able to guess the runner-up. Turns out lots of people were angry with the Fish and Wildlife Service for threatening to remove the gray wolf from the endangered species list. One person even submitted the same comment over 30 times.

And third was the EPA, which might have scored higher if all the comments submitted in bulk were counted individually.

Bump says “the best, most comprehensive comment that came up in our search… was to the IRS, of course, and neatly wraps up the entire exercise.” How do people really feel about government agencies?

I urge the federal government to F-off

That seems to be a consensus.

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.