On November 3, Saturday Night Live comedian Pete Davidson made fun of Texas Republican Dan Crenshaw’s eye patch. Crenshaw wears it, because he was maimed in a terrible IED attack, which took his interpreter’s life and almost blinded him for the rest of his life.

Davidson’s joke?  He said the Republican looked like a “hit man in a porno movie” before adding, “I know he lost his eye in war or whatever.”

I hardly believe that joke was worth insulting a man’s pain, and the rest of the conservative movement agreed.  What an opportunity for us to pounce on this liberal comedian, right?  I mean, you hardly have a better opportunity to score points of righteous indignation.  And that’s exactly what happened.  The Twittersphere erupted with anger and fury.  However, the man at the center of the controversy did not erupt.

He pointed out why he had lost his eye and moved on.

Then, Saturday Night Live called and asked him to appear on the show for an official apology.

He did, and it melted the nation’s cold partisan heart:

In our bitter political battles, this is the beautiful, touching moment we needed.

Hat Tip: SNL

Image Credit: YouTube 

 

 

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.