If you were watching the Cowboys/Packers game this weekend, you may have been surprised to see Ellen DeGeneres and former President George W. Bush sitting right next to each other and shown on the Jumbotron.

People on social media saw it and were – you guessed it — outraged.  One side was mad at Ellen for sitting next to a conservative.  Another was angry at Bush for sitting next to a gay Hollywood liberal.

What gives?

On her show, Ellen explained that she ended up in Cowboys’ owner Jerry Jones’ box as a guest of his daughter.  She also talks about her friendship with former President George W. Bush.

In a funny and kind-spirited monologue, she admits that she is friends with people who do not share all of her viewpoints.

This used to be basic politeness, folks.  Regrettably, now it is so rare to see people who’ll give people with opposing political views any respect at all.

Watch her humorous bit about sitting next to the former President below.  And maybe, be inspired to reach across the political aisle yourself this week.

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.