Well, life comes at you fast.

If you’d told me a couple of years ago that the Democrats new platform for 2018 would include a promise to “drain the swamp,” I wouldn’t have believed you.  But here we are.  They apparently — rightly — believe that Americans are sick of the corruption of the federal government.

Mike Lillis, writing for The Hill, explains:

The strategy marks an expansion of the Democrats’ midterm agenda, “A Better Deal,” which up until now has focused almost exclusively on kitchen-table economic issues in lieu of the controversies surrounding President Trump and a growing list of people in his orbit.

In extending their message to include an anti-corruption component, the Democrats are painting the Trump administration — and its Republican supporters on Capitol Hill — as an unscrupulous group that’s using power to pad its own pockets while peddling policies to the highest corporate bidder. The Democrats are promising voters they’d be an alternative: The party that would clean the place up.

“President Trump has embraced the most egregious establishment Republican norms and appointed the most conflict-of-interest-ridden Cabinet in my lifetime,” Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Monday at a press briefing on the steps of the Capitol.

“The swamp has never been more foul, or more fetid, than under this president.”

Frankly, I’m all for it.  I think it’s wonderful that the Democrats are finally choosing a theme that will resonate with everyday Americans.  I’ve written extensively about how — 15 months into the Trump presidency — the swamp is still teeming with corruption. So, in this rare instance, I have to agree with the Democrats: it doesn’t seem likely that Mr. Trump will be able to “drain the swamp,” no matter how hard he tries.  

Most politicians —  those who wear the MAGA hats and those who wear “Nevertheless, She Persisted” shirts — can’t resist the corrosive nature of power. Fortunately, the power of “we the people” is not limited to appealing to these politicians.

As I wrote in the New York Times:

Our founders anticipated the inevitable corruption of our political class and gave us a tool in Article V of the Constitution to fight back. It’s not enough to threaten to withhold our vote in the polling booth and hope — in spite of the evidence — that the next politicians will somehow be better. They won’t. Article V gives states the ability to propose amendments that might, for example, rein in an out-of-control, undisciplined government.

Let our continuing disappointment about multiple presidential administrations be a wake-up call: We can take away the power of Washington once and for all and return it to the American people.

Hat Tip: The Hill

Image Credit: By Linda MacPhee-Cobb (alligator in swamp) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.

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