Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx has been in hot water over the way here office has flubbed the Jussie Smollett case.  Smollett  is the “Empire” star who was caught staging a Jan. 29 racial incident in Chicago.  The 36 year old actor claimed two men yelled, “This is MAGA country,” during an alleged attack that resulted in the actor having a noose around his neck.

Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx has been in hot water over the way here office has flubbed the Jussie Smollett case.  Smollett  is the “Empire” star who was caught staging a Jan. 29 racial incident in Chicago.  The 36 year old actor claimed two men yelled, “This is MAGA country,” during an alleged attack that resulted in the actor having a noose around his neck.

Yes, a noose.  He wasn’t much for nuance, was he?

Alas, Smollett wasn’t a talented enough actor to pull it off.  Pretty soon, suspicions swirled.  It was revealed that he’d hired two people to pretend to be hate-filled bigots…. Some say he did this to garner enough attention to bolster his fledging career.

Let that sink in for one second.  He purposefully tried to disparage Trump voters, to bolster his career on a show watched by Trump voters.  I’m not sure he thought this through.

Predictably, Foxx is in more hot water as other criminals complain that they aren’t being handled with the same kid gloves as Smollett. 

First time offender, 21 year-old Candace Clark, faces one felony count over an alleged check forgery. Her public defender argued before the court that – surprise! — a double standard existed between Clark’s case and Smollett’s.  Red Statehas more:

Cook County Judge Marc Martin, who was presiding over an unrelated case, chastised Foxx and her office for creating a situation where anyone charged with filing a false report would expect the same leniency her office afforded Smollett.

[…]

“Well, Ms. Clark is not a movie star, she doesn’t have a high-price lawyer, although, her lawyer’s very good. And this smells, big time,” Martin said to prosecutors during a recent hearing, Fox 32 reported. “I didn’t create this mess, your office created this mess. And your explanation is unsatisfactory to this court. She’s being treated differently.”

The judge continued, “There’s no publicity on this case. She doesn’t have Mark Geragos as her lawyer or Ron Safer or Judge Brown. It’s not right. And (if) I proceed in this matter, you’re just digging yourselves further in a hole. (If the) press gets a hold of this, it’ll be in a newspaper. Why is Ms. Clark being treated differently than Mr. Smollett?”

It’s a legitimate question.

The prosecution has seriously screwed up the Smollett case…. Some say this was purposeful, to let it disappear into the background noise.  

But as Yale professor Nicholas Christakis lamented on Twitter, many people are suffering because of his actions.  The only person who isn’t suffering is Smollett himself.  “When lies multiply and become convoluted. Smollett’s manufactured attack is now causing misery for so many, except himself,” Christakis wrote. “He should be deeply ashamed and should be called to account for his crime.”

Image Credit: Wikipedia

Hat Tip: Red State

Image Credit: Wikipedia

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.