I guess it should come as no surprise that Celine Dion’s ad for her gender neutral clothing line is weird.  But it really is.  The new line, called CELINUNUNU (because it’s in partnership with the brand Nununu — see what they did there?) has over 70 “stereotype-free styles” for kids.

The Daily Wire has the details:

The futuristic ad features Dion, playing herself, breaking into a hospital nursery to magically change the infants’ pink and blue blankets to gender-neutral CELINUNUNU clothing.

“Our children — they are not really our children, as we are all just links in a never-ending chain that is life,” says Dion in the ad. “For us, they are everything. But in reality, we are only a fraction of their universe. We miss the past; they dream of tomorrow.”

“We may thrust them forward into the future, but the course will always be theirs to choose,” the Canadian singer says before ridding all gendered symbolism.

Well, isn’t it interesting that this singer believes she’s doing the world a favor by ridding the world of gender stereotypes?  Aren’t there more insidious stereotypes to rid the world of?

The singer explained her desire for gender neutrality originated by watching her own sons:

“The first time I brought them to Disney, I thought they were going to go for the big superheroes,” she said, referring to her own children. “They were looking at princesses, and they all wanted to be Minnie Mouse. And then I said, well, what about Mickey? And then I’m saying to myself, you know, what? It’s okay. You know why it’s okay? They’re talking; they’re finding themselves.”

“You don’t know what they’re going to become later,” she continued. “You don’t want for them to have a problem of growth and say, ‘I’m supposed to be like that. I’m supposed to say that. I’m supposed to dress like this. Because I’m a guy, I’m a boy, I’m supposed to do…’ No. No. You don’t know.”

You really need to see this odd commercial to believe it:

Um…  what did I just see?  I understand why people would call security on an egomaniac blowing black dust particles on children, magically taking off their clothes and replacing them with others.

Anyway, Dion wants you to know this: she’s not trying to tell you how to raise your children.  Here’s her one piece of advice: “let people be who they are as quick and as soon as possible.”

Wait just one second though… what if I’m a parent who wants my son to act like a man and my daughter to act like a woman?  Is that okay, for people like Dion to let me be that as quick and soon as possible?

No, the tolerance only extends only one way.  And that “one way” leads straight to confusion and unnecessary angst.  I will give some unsolicited parenting advice.

  1. Stay away from gender neutral clothing and don’t listen to anti-science liberals.
  2. Let your girls like princesses.
  3. Let your boys play football.
  4. Let your kids reflect their actual, God given, biology.
  5. And probably neither gender should listen to Celine Dion, unless she’s sticking to what she does best: sing songs that play on gender stereotypes related to love and romance.

Hat Tip: The Daily Wire

Image Credit: Wikipedia

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.