Parents are outraged after dozens of faculty members at The Dalton School, a prestigious K-12 school in New York, signed a ridiculous anti-racism manifesto.

The once-esteemed school boasts an impressive list of alumni, including Anderson Cooper, Christian Slater and Claire Danes. But it turns out the over $50,000 yearly tuition isn’t enough to escape the mob. 

The New York Post reported some of the endless demands.

  • Hiring 12 full-time diversity officers, and multiple  psychologists to support students “coping with race-based traumatic stress.” 
  • Assigning a staffer dedicated to black students who have “complaints or face disciplinary action,” and a full-time advocate to help black kids “navigate a predominantly white institution.”
  • Paying the student debt of black staffers upon hiring them.
  • Requiring courses that focus on “Black liberation” and “challenges to white supremacy.” 
  • Compensating any student of color who appears in Dalton promotional material.
  • Abolishing high-level academic courses by 2023 if the performance of black students is not on par with non-blacks. 
  • Requiring “anti-racism” statements from all staffers.
  • Overhauling the entire curriculum, reading lists and student plays to reflect diversity and social justice themes.
  • Divesting from companies that “criminalize or dehumanize” black people, including private prisons and tech firms that manufacture police equipment or weapons.
  • Donating 50 percent of all fundraising dollars to NYC public schools if Dalton is not representative of the city in terms of gender, race, socioeconomic background, and immigration status by 2025.

Officials claimed the document is just “a set of thought-starters created last summer by a group of faculty and staff responding to Dalton’s commitment to becoming an anti-racist institution,” but “The school does not support all the language or actions it contains.” 

The list of demands was first reported by Naked Dollar blogger Scott Johnston, who claimed teachers were refusing to return until the demands were met.

One outrageous stipulation even demanded the school theater only perform plays with “anti-racism messages.”  Even “To Kill a Mockingbird” is allegedly off limits according to Johnston, due to the fact it features a white man trying to “save” a black man. 

One disgruntled parent told the New York Post he is planning to pull his kid out of the prestigious school, along with an estimated “30 to 40%” of other parents.  That will hit them in the wallet.

Dalton is just the most recent in a string of schools deciding anti-racism is more important than education. If this trend continues, students will be less educated, more polarized, and race-obsessed. Seriously, at this point it seems like the lists of demands are more important than education. It’s like the schools are holding our children for ransom, and the only education they are willing to deliver is in critical race theory. 

Hat Tip: New York Post, Naked Dollar

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.