I read something recently that said that movies are filled with criminal masterminds, since in real life criminals seem to be a little less than Mensa members.

This, however, takes the cake:

Two armed men chose the wrong place to attempt a robbery Monday morning, when an employee at the Cobb County gun shop confronted them and shot one dead at the scene, Cobb County police said. The two men entered Dixie Gun and Pawn at 11 a.m. and attempted to rob the business. A store employee happened to be armed and exchanged gunfire with the men, striking one of them. The robbery suspect died at the scene, police said. The other suspect fled on foot. Police said Monday afternoon they have no information about him. The worker was not injured and the case remains under investigation.

Now, I am deeply saddened that a life ended in this way.  But who in their right minds assumes that gun store workers will not be armed?

Here’s what happened – warning, graphic:

Again, this is a ridiculous loss of life. But it’s important to share these videos because our the 2nd amendment is not about hunting.

A big part of self-governance is being able to protect yourself and your family from people (and yes, even governments) who try to hurt you.

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.