A new cartoon featured in The New Yorker has Instapundit raving, “Elitists gotta elite.” That’s a correct assessment.

The cartoon is set inside an airplane cabin. A white, mustached man is standing and speaking to the other passengers: “These smug pilots have lost touch with regular passengers like us. Who thinks I should fly the plane?”

Many hands are raised.

See, that’s The New Yorker’s sly way of slamming conservatives for calling in check an all-too-powerful federal government back in November. But in its efforts to paint those of us who ascribe to small government principles as elitists, the magazine uncovered itself as such.

And like Instapundit also noted, “Our credentialed-but-not-educated elites have crashed the plane plenty of times. They always walk away unscathed afterward. The folks back in Economy Class, not so much.”

It’s these smug liberals who are the ones clinging to bitterness because the folks in Economy Class have spoken. At the same time, it’s this liberal elitist attitude that gave rise to their own nemesis in Donald Trump, as the Federalist co-founder Sean Davis said:

Click CONTINUE for some other great reactions to this ridiculous cartoon:

1 2

About The Author

Mark Meckler

Mark was a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, and served as the national coordinator. He left the organization to work more broadly on expanding the self-governance movement beyond the partisan divide. Mark appears regularly on television in outlets as diverse as MSNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News, CNN, Bloomberg, Fox Business and the BBC. He’s highly sought after for the tea party perspective from print and electronic media outlets, from the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, L.A. Times, Washington Examiner, Politico and the The Hill. Mark blogs at MarkMeckler.com, and his opinion editorials regularly run in many of the leading political newspapers both on and offline. Mark has a BA in English from San Diego State University and graduated with honors from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law in 1988. He practiced real estate and business law for almost a decade. For the last eleven years of his legal career he specialized in Internet advertising law. When not fighting for the future of our nation, Mark is an avid horseman, and lives in rural northern California with his wife Patty and two children.